Nunavut Post

Wednesday, February 8, 2023

Arctic Inspiration Prize gives $3 million to 8 grantees

Nunavut

Key takeaways: 

  • It’s the second year AIP has granted $3 million in a row.
  • Members of the Indigenous Community Safety Partner Program respond upon hearing they won a $500,000 Arctic Inspiration Prize for their Indigenous-led activity, certification, and mentorship program prepared to support Yukon First Nations in managing the root reasons of inter-generational trauma and violence and vulnerability.

Recipients awarded $3 million: 

Almost $3 million was rewarded to eight associations across the North as part of the 10th yearly Arctic Inspiration Prize.

The prizes, broadcast Friday evening on CBC and APTN, are Canada’s most prominent annual prizes. It delivers seed grants to new and creative projects that improve the North’s lives.

Artist Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory and singer William Greenland hosted the virtual ceremony from opposing flanks of the nation — she was in Iqaluit, and he was in B.C. — but that didn’t stop the ritual from having an intimate and celebratory feeling.

Ilagiitigut anngiangijaqatigiinnirq ilurqusivuttigut was rewarded the $1 million grand award for constructing a 32-bed facility in Kuujjuaq, Nunavik, in northern Quebec.

Also read: Penalties imposed against those implicated with Russian-controlled aircraft grounded in Yellowknife

$8 million given to 8 recipients

This will help households who are heeding an addiction recovery program together. 

The project seeks to incorporate best practices in addiction with Inuit traditional knowledge, values, and culture by getting together Elders, addiction advisors, hunters, scholars, and society members to handle the root reasons of addiction, including intergenerational trauma.

“We’re very thankful that we’re remembered,” expressed George Kauki, co-team leader, adding it was the third year in a row the task was set for the grand prize. “We’re happy our determination paid off.”

“It’s excellent news for the province and Inuit people,” added Sarah May, also a co-team captain. “It’s proceeding to provide a lot of hope for the province, for individuals who are seeking support and knowing that there’s a place that they can go to and get help.”

Source – cbc.ca

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