Nunavut Post

Wednesday, February 28, 2024

Beer and wine outselling hard alcohol states Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission

Nunavut

Key takeaways: 

  • That was the entire purpose of the beer and wine shop, and I think that’s working.’
  • Daniel Young, director of the Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission, states individuals prefer more products with lower liquor content over hard alcohol.

Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission disclose stats: 

The Iqaluit beer and wine shop sold a $12.5 million value of liquors in 2021. 

Daniel Young, director of the Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission, states individuals prefer more products with lower liquor content over hard alcohol. 

“That was the entire intent of the beer and wine]store, and I think that’s working,” stated Young. Source – cbc.ca

The Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission earned $1.67 million off of spirits in 2017. That includes pubs, restaurants, special occasions, beer and wine shops, and community mandates. 

Also read: ‘She’s given over the shop; this is her heritage’: Book Cellar alters ownership

Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission setting limitations on liquor purchasing

The Iqaluit beer and wine shop became permanent in June 2020, intending to ease problematic liquor consumption, promote responsible drinking and fight to bootleg. 

There are limitations imposed on how much liquor a single individual can buy at the beer and wine shop. Up to 24 cans or bottles of beer or coolers, or up to four bottles of wine or one three-liter trunk.

 Combinations can have two bottles of wine and 12 cans or three bottles of wine and six cans. 

But alcohol buys through the Nunavut Liquor and Cannabis Commission do not have limitations. Young states this is a law of the Liquor Act and a government’s judgment at the moment. 

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